Oil Spill- Links and Notes from TTG Show May 10

These are links and notes from our Monday May 10, 2010 radio show.

The following quotes are from the Washington Post article:

“A target of the investigation, according to Rep. Ed Markey (D-Mass.), who chairs the House energy subcommittee and met with oil company officials last week, is the final cementing job on the well. Four employees of Halliburton — founded by Erle Halliburton in 1924 as the Halliburton Oil Well Cementing Company — were on Deepwater Horizon. They had overseen the main task of cementing the well just 20 hours before the blowout.

A petroleum engineer whose name is not public, but who called the Mark Levin radio show in New York and is now represented by New Orleans attorney Scott Bickford, has given an account of what happened in the final moments before the blowout, according to a report in the New Orleans Times-Picayune. He said that the heavy drilling mud was pulled from the well and replaced with lighter sea water before the second cement plug was put in place. According to Bickford, this lowered the resistance to the natural pressure of the well, and a bubble of gas surged upward.

Whatever happened with the cement, the mud and the plugs, there was supposed to be a fail-safe mechanism: the blowout preventer. This massive apparatus has multiple valves that can close the well, plus a pair of blind-shear rams that can slice right through the pipe in an emergency.
Survivors say they hit the red button on the rig to activate the system. The device also has a “dead man’s” switch that should have worked when the well erupted even if there was no manual signal from above.

Deffeyes, the Princeton professor, said, “Here we have the statistically unlikely case of both systems failing.” The blowout is one failure, the blowout preventer’s malfunction is the second, and there may even be a third failure, he said — for example, if the steel casing was improperly attached to the blowout preventer.”
http://www.washingtonpost.com/wp-dyn/content/article/2010/05/08/AR2010050803429_3.html?nav=rss_email/components&sid=ST2010050800010

Moratorium lifted on offshore drilling- environmental concerns raised.
http://www.bellona.org/articles/articles_2010/US_drilling_moratorium_lifted

Could the oil spill now be used to push the agenda of the globalists through limiting our use of oil and privatizing our water?
Example article on the water privatization issue and Canada:
http://www.cbc.ca/news/features/water/

SWAT teams sent by US to inspect oil rigs in Gulf of Mexico after blowout
http://www.rushlimbaugh.com/home/daily/site_042910/content/01125113.guest.html

Mr. Obama said SWAT teams were being dispatched to the Gulf to investigate oil rigs and said his administration is now working to determine the cause of the disaster.
http://www.cbsnews.com/stories/2010/04/29/national/main6444311.shtml

Definition of SWAT team from Wikipedia*:
A SWAT (special weapons and tactics) team is an elite paramilitary tactical unit in American and some international law enforcement departments. They are trained to perform high-risk operations that fall outside of the abilities of regular officers. Their duties include performing hostage rescues and counter-terrorism operations, serving high risk arrest and search warrants, subduing barricaded suspects, and engaging heavily-armed criminals.
*Note: It doesn’t say anything about oil rigs.

Article above refers to Exxon Valdez spill. Background info on Exxon-Valdez spill from Wikipedia:
The Exxon Valdez oil spill ocurred in Prince William Sound, Alaska, on March 24, 1989, when the Exxon Valdez, an oil tanker bound forLong Beach, California, hit Prince William Sound’s Bligh Reef and spilled an estimated minimum 10.8 million US gallons (40.9 million litres, or 250,000 barrels) of crude oil. It is considered to be one of the most devastating human-caused environmental disasters ever to occur in history.[1] As significant as the Valdez spill was — the largest ever in US waters — it ranks well down on the list of the world’s largest oil spills in terms of volume released.[2] However, Prince William Sound’s remote location (accessible only by helicopter, plane and boat) made government and industry response efforts difficult and severely taxed existing plans for response. The region is a habitat for salmon, sea otters, seals and seabirds. The oil, originally extracted at the Prudhoe Bay oil field, eventually covered 1,300 miles (2,100 km) of coastline[3]and 11,000 square miles (28,000 km2) of ocean.[4]

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Exxon_Valdez_oil_spill

Refering to the Exxon-Valdez spill does give the impression that it happened before and life went on relatively as normal, so this too shal pass, but it is hardly a comparable situation. Exxon Valdez happened in a remote part of Alaska. The Mexican Gulf spill is affecting coastal areas of the US and Mexico, in areas of human habitation. Will affect tourism, food prices, destroy large parts of fishing and shrimping industries, and deal another blow to an already damaged US economy.

Advertisements

One response to “Oil Spill- Links and Notes from TTG Show May 10

  1. Pingback: Oil Spill – Washington Post raises questions « Divining the News (DTN)

Leave a Reply

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out / Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out / Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out / Change )

Google+ photo

You are commenting using your Google+ account. Log Out / Change )

Connecting to %s