Tag Archives: protest

Activist as Terrorist

WearechangeLA leader Bruno Bruhwiler was arrested on totally bogus charges this week.
http://www.wearechange.org/?p=2150
He was first sent out of a courtroom for having the wrong facial experssion, then detained and charged with tresspassing. When the ridiculousness of charging someone with tresspassing on public property was considered, the charge was changed to “contempt of court”. But wait! The judge hadn’t held him in contempt so… let’s change that to “causing a public disturbance”.
(officers scratching heads) “Hmmm…There’s gotta be SOMETHING we can charge him with…Ok, let’s just make something up. How about ‘resisting arrest’? He didn’t resist? Let’s just say he did. let’s say he did it, say…Twice. And let’s add that he threatened you. He threatened you, ok?”
– Ok, if you say so. What did he threaten me with?”
– Assassination.
– Ok, sounds good.
– Great! Now we can charge him as a terrorist!
– Another job well done.”

The conversation must have gone something like that. Activists are being treated as terrorists everywhere from LA to Montreal. An article in our local paper, the Gazette, described how activists’ friends were being visited by CSI as part of an intimidation tactic, not intented to actually gather information, but to mes with the activists so they would then do something to incriminate themselves.

Meanwhile, a lady who is a nurse and a mother of five children was visited by the FBI who insisted that their visit had nothing to do with her involvement in protests against what Israel is doing to the Palestinians, and that it was her right to protest and that is a wonderful thing, but that they were there to find out if she had any knowledge of things that may result from the protests, such as violent acts or destruction of property. These agents must have aced their NWO double-think classes in Police State School. If you are an activist, you may want to watch this video. She gives some good tips about how to deal with such a visit.

Ban The Niqab

This has been going on for a while, the push to ban the Niqab. I’m no muslim but this one bugs me in a big way and I’ll tell you why.
If you read the papers around here, you will see that the debate appears to center around whether the niqab makes people uncomfortable and whether it is fair for veiled muslim women to receive government services without having to uncover their face. While you are busy raising your bloodpressure over the question of whether foreigners should have to sacrifice a certain amount of religious freedom when they move to Canada, you are missing the true reason for why the niqab has been made into an issue at all: it interferes with the implementation of facial recognition software in surveillance systems.

In Quebec, the debate centers around the hapless pharmacist Naema Ahmed, who was twice thrown out of a government- mandated French class for refusing to remove her veil. The second time she was given the boot, it was in the middle of an exam, adding academic injury to cultural insult.
The public immediately split up into camps on the issue of religious freedom versus cultural intergation, spouting phrases like “If you want to come to Canada, you have to abide by Canadian law”, although no law exists against wearing a veil, and “The veil makes people uncomfortable: we want to see your face”.

Baaa, baa, baaa.

You don’t appreciate a veiled pharmacist? Is it for security reasons? Maybe you think she will send an impostor and poison her clients. Or perhaps, you just don’t like to be served by someone whose face is hidden. Allow me to just point out that when you go to the pharmacy, you give your order to a technician and pick it up from a cashier. The pharmacist often does nothing more than verify the prescription. She does give consultation, but if you are willing to take consultation over the phone from Info-Sante, not being able to see her face should be a non-issue. And if it still bothers you, you could always go across the street to another pharmacy.

Or is the issue just one of making people feel uncomfortable in general? Many things make people feel uncomfortable: public nose-picking and farting top the list. Maybe public rudeness should be outlawed, too. Unusual dress of all kinds makes some people squirm. Will that kid with the green mohawk be forced to remove his plethora of piercings before entering the classroom? How about transexual men in cheap wigs? And the guys who wear their pants so low you can see their crack? And while we’re on the subject of pants, how about the girls with the low-rise jeans who flaunt their neon-green thongs for all to see? Maybe what Quebec needs is a Minister of Modesty who will oversee the new dress code. Modest, but not too modest. Something that will ensure that no-one is ever offended by another’s attire. Maybe a uniform. It worked so well for communist China, after all.

Oh, but I digress. I was going to tell you why this has nothing to do with culture or religious freedom and everything to do with implementing a police state through the installation of cameras with facial recognition software.

You may remember that a little while back, the debate over facial coverings in Quebec had nothing to do with niqabs and everything to do with protesters. Unmask the trouble-makers! It’s for public safety!

I would like to point out that if anyone is doing anything illegal at a protest, the omnipresent riot police should be able to arrest them on the spot. So what is the problem with facial coverings? Oh, it prevents suspects who got away from later being identified and apprehended. This, of course, would not be possible either unless there were cameras in place to capture their naked mugs for later analysis.

If you want to see where we are heading in terms of surveillance, all you have to do is look at England, where they now have not only thousands of cameras eyeing your every move, but even programs by which citizens can serve their country by spying on their fellow- Londoners and promptly correcting their behaviour by addressing them through loudspeakers. “Madam, you have dropped your cigarette butt: please pick it up”.

We are surrounded with propaganda when it comes to the niqab debate, but it is not about manipulating you to suddenly feel there is a pressing need to force people to accommodate to ‘Canadian culture’- whatever that is. It’s about making you think that is the issue in the first place.

Olympics, Protests and Provocateurs

Article written by Kiwi Kush aka Youtube user bruisedkiwi
http://www.youtube.com/user/bruisedkiwi
Website: http://yourepidemic.blogspot.com/

I was at the protest and have done a bunch of searchings on news items written about Vancouver and the protests.

The world wide media seems to really be picking up on the real issues and why 60% of people in Vancouver oppose the Vancouver Olympics and think it’s a waste of money.

I’ve compiled some of the best from my internet searchings around, for those who are interested in what the world is hearing about us.

One of my favorite quotes of today from the news:

“As the protesters headed down the street, numerous bystanders started lining the curb, taking photographs, not unlike the torch relay”

http://www.usatoday.com/sports/olympics/vancouver/2010-02-12-olympic-demonstrations_N.htm

The Angus Reid poll, released Thursday, found that a majority of those interviewed — 63 per cent — expect the Vancouver Games to run a deficit, and 83 per cent believe the Games are planned to benefit elite members of society.

Almost 60 per cent of respondents agreed with the statement that the Vancouver Olympics are a waste of money that could be used for more important things.

http://www.vancouversun.com/sports/Metro+Vancouver+residents+remain+ambivalent+Olympics+poll/2552061/story.html

Kansas Times writes about Vancouvers World (and extreme poverty) outside the Olympics Bubble…

http://www.kansascity.com/495/story/1744824.html

Read more about provocateurs being used at the Vancouver Olympics on the MTL 911Truth website
http://www.mtl911truth.org/?p=3011